Tag Archives: Waitrose

Anya Hindmarch’s cereal partnership is far from soggy

13 Oct

If you didn’t fancy a bowl of Kellogg’s finest before reading this blog, you will now.

Thanks to fashion designer Anya Hindmarch – the woman behind the ‘I’m Not a Plastic Bag’ campaign – the latest trend is vintage-inspired accessories that pay homage to big brands. From Ariel washing powder clutches and Custard Cream purses to Rich Tea baguettes and Coco Pops totes, this collection has hit the shelves at a time when demand for nostalgic kitsch has almost hit the roof.

And one in particular has caught my eye – Frosties.

With a fresh landing page, a strong social media presence and bold e-comms, this partnership is unique because both brands benefit from the added value. Here’s how:

Anya Hindmarch
Having been inspired to develop the limited edition Fashion Flakes range as part of her Counter Culture collection – inspired by her passion for making the ordinary, extraordinary – the bags are exclusive to her stores in London and Paris, instantly making it a sought-after product.

But, so not to put the products on a pedestal, Anya’s cleverly employed the use of social media to create a buzz – making these luxury items seem attainable to the average cereal eater.

Fans are being encouraged to post images or films on Instagram, tagging @anyahindmarch with the hashtag #cerealshopper for the chance to win a £1,350 bag.

With each Instagram post featuring the collection – or the Frosties-themed milk float, which formed part of a PR photo-call where cereal was handed out during London Fashion a Week – reaching 57,000 followers and generating in the region of 1,000 likes, it’s by far the best platform for the designer to show off.

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Frosties
But, what does Kellogg’s get in return for loaning out its family favourite brand I hear you ask? Well, whether you’re a collector or just like your cereal boxes with a pinch of class, you can get your hands on a redesigned Frosties box for a respectable £3 (the same calibre high-end creation at the snippet of the price).

Of course, Tony the Tiger is holding one of Anya’s bags as an extra plug, but on the whole the metro (modern vs retro) interpretation looks good and gives Kellogg’s some new content for its comms channels – something a 100+ year old brand must be desperate for. It’s also been able to share the love with Waitrose where the chic cereal will be available for a short period.

So, as you can see, two totally different brands from different sectors and with different audiences (the proportion of women with Anya’s luxury handbags who eat Frosties is considerably small, or so I assume) can successfully work together.

It’s simply a case of sharing key assets – in this case it’s Tony – and making it relevant to each other’s customer base using the right comms channels. It’s like a formula and this one has been well executed:

 

Photo-call launch + global news hook + exclusive product + competition + social media = brand awareness + recognition + engagement = sales

Do you agree? What element of the partnership do you think tastes grrreat?

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A child Picasso gives Waitrose a helping hand

26 Aug

20140430-231008.jpgThey say the ‘kids are all right’. But, the phrase should be the kids are always right. Earlier this year a little girl wrote a letter to Lego complaining that boys had all the fun because they got the chance to play the hero, whereas female figures had limited prospects sunbathing on the beach or relaxing at the beauty parlour. Lego listened and promptly launched a limited edition set of inspirational female scientists that have sold out in stores in the US.

Now, seven-year old Harry Deverill, from Dorset, has taken it upon himself to redesign Waitrose’s bottle of brown sauce. He couldn’t work out what the current picture was meant to be, so supplied the supermarket chain with three alternatives. And, as a result, it’s replaced its essential range’s brown sauce label with one of his images.

It was always going to be a success.

Up-market supermarket Waitrose, which previously slid to PR success, has not only shown that it listens to its customers’ suggestions (note suggestion, not complaint), but that it’s also open to change. And, in doing so, has proved that it understands good PR.

I’m sorry Harry but, in the foodservice industry, updating packaging that has existed from the beginning of time is not high on its list of priorities. After all, it’s got shelf space, profit margins and new products – such as Curiosity Cola, Birds Eye Mas#Tags and Warburtons – to contend with. But, in spite of all this, it knows that putting a call into its printing factory is worth generating content for its own publications (Waitrose Kitchen and Waitrose Weekend) and national consumer titles such as the Daily Mail, Daily Express and the Metro.

Although, this wouldn’t be Prime Time if I couldn’t find a way to critique the perfect PR stunt.

Taking a proper look at the previous label’s artwork I can conclude that it’s bad – really bad. Why Waitrose has been precious about it for so long is beyond me. So, why not extend the opportunity and launch a competition for other children to submit their designs for its essentials range? I appreciate that redesigning the entire collection might be a bit much, but it could start with the condiments and table sauces and work it’s way through the shop slowly.

This will generate even more content for the brand to roll out across its:

a) Social media channels
Competition entry galleries where fans are encouraged to vote for their favourite image.

b) Marketing magazines
Features on the children behind the winning designs.

c) TV shows
PR through cookery demonstration discussions.

A competition would also lend itself to a local PR campaign in hotspot areas, with the results transitioning into advertising slogans.

It’s come this farand I salute Waitrose for its willing gesture. But, it doesn’t have to be a one-hit wonder. Keep the momentum going by involving more customers and sit back and enjoy the results.

What do you think?

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Would you prefer a tattoo of your boss or £25k?

3 Nov

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Crowd-sourcing was coined in 2006 by Wired Magazine. It was used to describe a job, which was usually fulfilled by an employee, that was outsourced to a group of people. Since then it’s been used by brands in a range of weird and wonderful ways. From ‘dead dog‘ jingles to BrewDog’s Twitter beer, it generates ideas and content for businesses – and not many of them are sensible.

Now, premium crisps brand Tyrrells has embraced this fact and, after asking its social media fans for ideas for prizes to bring its promotional packs to life, is running with them. That’s right, Tyrrells is giving consumers the chance to win: a tattoo of your boss, an uncomfortably long handshake or a packet of soil.

Well, blow me down and take me to Waitrose right now because this is the best incentive ever to buy a packet of crisps.

Of course, consumers have an opportunity to trade their prize for £25,000. But I’m looking out for one winner that’ll see the value in winning a pack of lies. After all, it’d make great content for the brand, and the results would be much wider than its own communications channels. You wouldn’t see a feature on a Walkers‘ cash prize winner in The Sun, but with this I can definitely imagine it. It’s PR-journalism gold.

With more than 60,000 consumers already engaging with Tyrrells across Facebook and Twitter, the brand has done a great job of interacting with them. It’s asked them questions and taken their answers seriously, including on the T&Cs, which makes this Field of Dreams marketing promotion a cut-above the rest. What’s more, up to 5 million more fans will have the chance to appreciate the brand’s humour as the competition’s rolled out across the country.

With the crisp market currently worth £927.5m in the UK alone, a well-executed campaign like this can help brands like Tyrrells close down the significant gap that Walkers currently enjoys. And it’s first using social noise to support its attempt.

What would you do? Opt for a sculpture of your Grandma or the money?

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