Tag Archives: price

A perfect World Cup tweet gone wrong

18 Jun

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I’ve decided that when Taylor Swift first sang the words ‘I knew you were trouble when you walked in’ she was talking about one of two things: 1D’s Harry Styles or the perils of social media.

Social media is a bear trap for brands and the latest honey to lure them in is the World Cup. Put simply, if a tweet misses the net the person behind the shot will end up paying the price.

Playing the hand you’re Delta
On Monday night Delta Airlines decided to keep its 690,000+ followers updated on the final score of the USA (2) vs Ghana (1) match with this tweet.

20140618-103129.jpgAn ignorant stereotype
On the outside this looks like a great tweet. It’s factual, engaging and makes the most of iconic photography.

Look a little closer and you’ll see that it was all going so well until the company decided that the photo that best defined Ghana was a giraffe.

Moments later, experts quickly pointed out that giraffes don’t live in Ghana (If you didn’t already know this go straight to jail. Do not pass go and do not collect £200.)

In fact, with a bit of digging the experts discovered that this stock image had Kenya written all over it. (Well, you know what I mean.) So, there’s no reason, or excuse, for the Delta team to have got this one wrong.

Not only does it make the brand look a little unworldly – believe me for a travel company that’s not the adjective you want to be associated with – but also a little uncaring.

Cue the apology
To right its wrong, Delta did the only thing it could do in this situation: issue a public apology.

But, I can only imagine that its community manager was trembling with fear because it added an unnecessary step to its sorry note. It made a typo by referring to its ‘precious’ tweet (opposed to previous).

20140618-114716.jpgI’ve previously said that if a link between a brand and an event isn’t obvious then they shouldn’t be wading into the conversation at all.

Global events, like the World Cup, are not only notoriously difficult to generate cut-through, but when brands do get noticed it’s often because a mistake’s been made.

Destroying the evidence
Not that you’d ever know Delta had been issued a yellow card. The offending image has disappeared from the timeline and the airline has spent the last day ‘doing a Sainsbury’s‘ by directly apologising to its critics.

Perhaps I’m not giving Delta enough credit. It may have been completely in control of this risky stunt. But, it’s not one that I’d ever recommend.

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What a day for a lovely campaign!

13 Feb

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V… Va… Val… Valentine… No. I can’t quite finish that sentence but we both know what this blog post is going to be about don’t we? That’s right. Friday, 14th February.

You know the score. That time of the year where companies don’t just sell those holidays, razors or games. It markets love too. Here’s a round up of some of the best:

Virgin whistles for attention
Virgin is invading customers’ inboxes via a disruptive e-marketing campaign that uses flirty language and wolf-whistles when opened.

One word – amazing. Great job Lida. It complements the fun and cool appeal the brand has built up through TV campaigns. Compared to competitors, which are forced to focus on pricing and customer service, Virgin can afford to sit back and say ‘where can we take you?’ because it’s a brand consumers want to connect with.

The email’s tongue-in-cheek approach cements this and will hopefully see plenty of people take up its offer of a Caribbean holiday this Valentine’s Day.

But, if not, it can be sure the open rate will be high. I’d do anything to be on the receiving end of a wolf whistle. Virtual or not!

Freeview’s three in one romantic ready meal
With a recent survey revealing that 25% of couples will be shunning a session of public Valentine’s Day PDA for a night in on the sofa, Freeview has created a three in one ready meal.

The Valendines meal, by MHP Communications, is a quick and dirty PR stunt which will generate coverage but, arguably, it won’t be memorable. But, with a client like Freeview – for those who cant afford cable (not knocking, just describing myself) – it doesn’t need to be.

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Wilkinson Sword has a smooth approach to the big day
Unlike Freeview, leading razor brand Wilkinson Sword has really thought about its campaign.

With the tag line, ‘This is not the day to irritate her’, from far away an image of a man on a billboard looks as if he’s sporting stubble. But, on second look, it’s rose stems. It then disappears and the brand wishes people a smooth day.

This is a great idea that can work across multiple channels: advertising, marketing and social media. It has real shareability and should definitely have a hash tag.

‘I’m Game’ underwear
I know the point isn’t for Game to sell its his and hers underwear, which is currently on sale in its Stratford store, but I’d be interested to know how much it makes on it after the weeked.

The company developed the idea after its research revealed that one in four gamers will slink away this Valentine’s Day for a quick fix on a console.

It’s tacky and unnecessary but with coverage already on Digital Spy and Metro, it’s adding value to the brand at low cost.

Which of these lovely campaigns stand out to you?

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BA needs to make a Big Apology?

15 Jan

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Today there have been four official judgements made on discrimination over religious beliefs in the workplace. Of those four, just one went in favour of Christianity. And it’s not causing the Twitter storm I’d expected.

I’m even more surprised that Tweeters are taking this opportunity to condemn Eweida, Chaplin, Ladele and McFarlane and every other Christian ‘causing a fuss’ saying they’re the same people ‘trying to ban me from wearing skirts at work’.

Tweeters aside, I think it’s the employers – such as global airline British Airways – involved in today’s court hearings that are going to have to work very hard to prove that their ‘corporate images’ were worth be dragged through the courts. BA especially since 2006. (BA amended its policy in 2007 to accept employees wearing symbols of faith.) I can’t see in any way how crosses, or any other faith symbol, affects the type of service it should be delivering to meet customers’ needs.

It’s sad because after its brilliant ‘To Fly. To Serve‘ campaign and gold-medal attempt during the Olympics, persuading people to stay at home and cheer on Team GB, the BA brand has had to start 2013 on a sour note.

To make matters worse BA has so far not even acknowledged the case with even a single tweet, post on Facebook or a statement on its corporate site. A bit of a mistake when they knew the outcome was going to run globally, surely? And I definitely don’t think a headline of ‘diversity and equality’ on the airline’s jobs website is enough of a message or an apology for not protecting Eweida’s rights.

For companies to be the best, it has to have the best people working for them. And to attract the best people you have to allow them to be themselves.

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