Tag Archives: partner

What’s love got to do with it? Match.com partners with Mensa

30 Jun

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There comes a time when you have to admit that your blog life is better, and far more interesting, than your love life.

On Prime Time we’ve had a range of heart-shaped posts in the past. From wanting to break up with clients and top Valentine’s Day campaigns to Christian dating advertising slogans and kinky classifieds, there’s been lots to say and sadly it’s not got me anywhere.

But, now that Match.com has partnered with Mensa to connect geniuses (never underestimate yourself), perhaps my time has come.

Profile users can now add a Mensa badge to their profile to let prospective partners know that they’re looking for someone smart.

It’s a simple idea but it works – adding a fresh talking point to both brands’ bows, particularly Match.com.

I imagine that the dating service’s press releases and case studies are normally filed in journalists’ features folders, only allowed out for air in mid February when the media force feeds us with love stories.

But, this partnership provides the dating service and high-IQ society with an interesting news angle. It also complements our society’s increasing need to ‘pick and mix’ the type of people we want to get to know. Sticking a Mensa badge on your profile is as much a blockade as it is an invitation.

To add value to the partnership, Match.com is also offering users the chance to take a Mensa test for $1. Bargain.

So, while singletons are rushing to find out how smart they really are, I’d argue that Match.com actually has the highest IQ.

For a brand that’s synonymous with online dating (I dare you to ask the people around you what dating websites come into their head and I bet Match.com is first every time. If it isn’t, it’s because it didn’t work for them), its challenge is to continue pushing traditional marketing to one side and prioritising innovation.

Has this PR partnership got you head over heels?

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Royal Mail fails as brands attempt to cash in on World Cup buzz

12 Jun

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Call me naive (although I’d prefer it if you called me Donna*), but I didn’t even realise until this week that postal officers could refuse to deliver mail that they deemed offensive. But they can, and they did, when they were handed the latest issue of marketing magazine The Drum.

The front cover included the F-bomb, in large font, as part of a creative design tying in with the World Cup which kicks off today. (Go Belgium, thanks to my sweep stake pick). But, context aside, according to the Royal Mail, the subscription-only trade publication failed to comply with the company’s T&Cs of avoiding ‘offensive, obscene or threatening language’.

So, knowing what I know now, I’m not sure why I was surprised to read again today that there are reports of postal staff – possibly Royal Mail, possibly not – refusing to deliver a special edition of The Sun in the North West. A blow to the UK’s largest newspaper after it invested in creating a one-off paper celebrating ‘Englishness’ to celebrate the launch of that football tournament. There’s a pattern emerging here, don’t you think?

Reaching 22 million people across the UK and not a Page 3 model in sight, The Sun had already pre-empted a negative reaction from Liverpool, so decided against distributing there, as a result of the newspaper’s Hillsborough football disaster coverage. But, reports are circulating that elsewhere in the North of England – including Runcorn, St Helens, Skelmersdale and Ellesmere Port – that postal staff wouldn’t agree to deliver in these areas if asked.

At a time when the print journalism industry is struggling to stay alive, because consumers are choosing to eat their news and views in more convenient digital bites, I’m surprised that delivery companies like the Royal Mail are turning their back on print partners. Surely, these corporate contracts – whether they’re one-off projects on long-term – are their bread and butter. And, without them they’ll just go hungry! Particularly if their hunger pangs come down to language preference, like in The Drum’s case.

It’s for the end consumer to make the complaint and, if they’re offended, the issue (no pun intended) should be taken up with the company responsible: the publisher, not the carrier.

FIFA has enough PR problems to deal with around this global event, besides whether its ‘brand’ can even be delivered to the right people. It needs to focus on protecting its image against rumours that half-built stadiums will be half empty, as well as the news that the Brazilian army has been asked to drive lingering drug lords out of local favelas.

Let’s hope these latest Royal Mail fails don’t reflect too badly on the tournament.

*That bad joke proves I am my mother’s child, just in case anyone was wondering.

The Drum editor says 'F@£! It' to Royal Mail over F-bomb front cover

The Drum editor says ‘F@£! It’ to Royal Mail over F-bomb front cover

Volvic goes back to its roots with Tough Mudder deal

23 Apr

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I have a confession to make. Seven months ago I completed the incredible Tough Mudder challenge, and sometimes I wear my victory t-shirt to the gym to subtly show other people on the treadmill how brilliant I am. By the way, it feels good.

If you don’t know what Tough Mudder is, I’ll pop it into a nutshell for you: it’s 12-miles of electrifying pain across muddy terrain that requires top teamwork to overcome physical and mental challenges for a great cause – Help for Heroes.

Last year, I entered a team of chefs on behalf of my client, Meadowland, and ended up escorting them (slowly, slowly catch a monkey) down the track. I hadn’t trained, I was tired and almost gave up after nine miles. But my team, and every other competitor, kept me motivated. And that’s the beauty of Tough Mudder. It’s a challenging movement with camaraderie at the heart of every step – which is a marketing dream for the right brand.

So, I’m impressed that Volvic has recognised the event’s reach by signing a three-year sponsorship deal.

More than having the foresight to partner with this international event, it’s also creating a digital campaign to bring it to life. From Facebook ‘fan’ galleries to YouTube content, it seeks to unite runners online as well as on the circuit.

Executed in the right way, Volvic has a great opportunity to generate a good return on its £550,000 deal, by:

* Raising brand awareness through Tough Mudder’s existing comms
* Generating effective content that can be leveraged across traditional and social media
* Getting its products into the hands of thousands of runners across a series of regional events year-on-year.

Let’s just hope, for everyone’s sake, there’s still a pint of Strongbow waiting for them at the end. It’d be a shame for this brand to step away just as it’s built up momentum. Water just won’t cut it when you’ve been electrocuted, frozen and thrown yourself off walls.

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