Tag Archives: momentum

Instagram won’t be the same again after reading this blog

13 Jul

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They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Then, what’s the value of an Instagram? I guess it depends on what filter you choose.

One thing’s for sure – brands are boosting their presence on the photo-sharing site and I don’t just mean using hashtags. Clever companies are now using it to build entire campaigns.

Ikea
To launch its new PS 2014 collection, Ikea used Instagram to create a mini website by creating a profile for each piece of furniture in the range, and linking them together using the tagging functions.

This allowed users to scroll through the different items on the site, just like flicking through a catalogue, because every page was linked. It also encouraged people to add to the website by snapping their own pieces and tagging them – to show they were associated with the brand.

Sky Rainforest Rescue
A partnership between Sky and the World Wildlife Fund, the charity has launched an Instagram account and uploaded a blend of 60 images and videos – each tile representing part of a design created by an artist – giving users a unique interactive tour of the Amazon.

From unique illustrations to exclusive blogger content, every time a user follows the account and clicks on one of the tiles, they’re automatically entered into a competition to win a pair of sustainable VEJA trainers, designed by ‘eco-warrior’ model Lily Cole.

It’s pretty obvious that these innovative campaigns are changing the way we use social media. So, what can we do to give our own profiles a makeover?

1) What’s your strategy?
I don’t mean to offend anyone with my patronising nugget of advice, but if you don’t know what you want to gain from Instagram, you won’t achieve anything.

– Want more followers?
– Want to network?
– Want user-generated content?

Create a tick list and prioritise in terms of importance. Then, look at what content you have and create a plan to either drip feed it over the coming weeks, building momentum, or sync it onto the page in full as part of a bigger campaign.

Right, lecture over. Back to the quick wins.

2) Chill out
Don’t go for the tough sell. Instagram is the perfect platform for brands to show off their talent and personalities.

If you wouldn’t read your own updates, chances are no one else will.

Worried that no one will really ‘get’ what you do? Then stream Instagram on your website. Problem solved.

3) Press record
In reference to my opening line, surely videos are worth a million words.

Quality is important, but don’t make a meal out of creating a video. As long as the content is clear and engaging, with a relevant call-to-action, it’ll work.

Then PR your post by shouting about it on your other social media channels.

Not enough? If you’re a bit more creative, you could always explore capitalising on the filter craze by creating your own branded option and pitching it into Instagram. That should get you noticed pretty quickly.

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PR: a step in the right direction

27 Aug

It’s amazing how many ideas you can come up with for brands that you don’t work for and today was no exception. In fact I was most productive during my lunch break, dividing a mini comms plan for new footwear company She’s So Shoes.

I was asked to pull together a quick press release to promote the new online retailer, which specialises in petite feet (that’s a UK size 4 and under if you’re wondering), to sell-in to the consumer and local press. But my mind is trained to think big. Or, in other words, think fee. And in this case: shoes.

Here are my three top-line ideas for this SME to walk towards an award-winning campaign:

1. Make the story personal
Research shows that more than a quarter of females in the UK have small feet (me included) – so I’d make the story personal by commissioning research to find the top 10 regions with the smallest feet, with a sample size of 2,000 for credibility. I’d then transform this data into an infographic to bring the topic to life before selling-in to fashion, lifestyle magazines and bloggers and national papers. The content can also be regionalised to the towns referenced in the study for extra impact and packaged as part of a radio day.

To go the extra mile, costs permitting, this PR story could also grab people’s attention by sending shoe samples to journalists and other fashion influencers – ideally those with small feet so they make use of the product. A single celebrity tweet can generate hundreds of re-tweets from fans who’ll drive traffic back to the brand’s website.

2. A picture’s worth a 1,000 words
It’s similar to what Carnaby Street did recently, but I’ve never been a fan of reinventing the wheel. So I’d compile a feature, working with the British Footwear Association, to put together a ‘who’s who’ of small feet. A blend of people from the past and present, famous and the unknown to place in the women’s national lifestyle supplements. Accompany with a photocall to bring the feature to life.

3. Pop up catwalk
PRs will want to position this company against other leading brands and what better way to show that these shoes can trample the rest by hosting a pop up catwalk in the capital?

With promotional models and members of the public, who can pick a pair of shoes to model, they can strut their stuff in an area that’s bound to attract attention. Think Millennium Bridge for photo purposes.

I’d recommend that a prize draw runs alongside the event and everyone that registers receives e-updates to get exclusive access to discounts to sustain campaign momentum.

These are three quick ideas that can help a brand to make an impact and get its ‘story’ started. A full campaign will require solid tactics to develop She’s So Shoes’ community and keep customers engaged with questions, offers and fashion ideas – driven by social media.

What would you do differently? Are you in need of some Prime Time PR ideas to get your brainstorm started?

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Cineworld indulges in childish insults

26 Apr

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Cinema brands get my goat. Why? Because they clearly don’t understand social media, but continue to put people in charge that either say too little or far too much – to the point where they insult their customers.

A few months ago I blogged about Odeon, which failed to respond to a Facebook status complaining about ticket prices. Hours became days and days became an entire weekend where nothing was done, allowing the post to gain momentum through more than 170,000 ‘likes’.

Now it’s Cineworld’s turn to commit social media suicide, although this time the brazen brand has no remorse. The tweets that you’re about to see are still on the company’s Twitter page.

Let’s start this story with a quiz. If a customer complained about costs to you on a social network would you:

A) Apologise that they feel that way and use a pre-approved policy statement to explain why costs have risen before directing them to special offers that you’re currently running etc

B) Ignore the statement, after all you’ve got so many other tweets to respond to

C) Antagonise your customer and explode into a flurry of insults and childish backchat

I’m sure you can guess by now that Cineworld took option ‘C’. The backchat included:

Well you ‘say’ we’re definitely going bust in 1-5 years. If you’re psychic can you tell me the lottery numbers.

For someone that doesn’t like talking to us, you’re certainly persistent. Excuse me I have homework to do :]

And my personal favourite:

Fine OK we’re just evil millionaires who are trying to destroy cinema, you’ve blown it wide open. Enjoy Odeon :]

Shocked? I’m guessing (and hoping) that this approach has lost Cineworld more than one customer since its 42,000 followers witnessed the feud with customer Alan Bishop.

But, what’s more frustrating about this story is that The Drum questioned whether brands should be engaging with Twitter trolls.

Let’s be clear – Alan is not a Twitter troll. He had an opinion which the company failed to recognise. Instead it was belittled and mocked in the public domain which won’t do Cineworld any favours. Perhaps the big bosses need to remind the social media managers that they’re being paid to have some manners.

Am I overreacting? Or should brands be sticking up for themselves like Cineworld? Let me know!

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