Tag Archives: Crowd

App brings new meaning to phrase ‘you snooze, you lose’

3 Nov

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If you didn’t already know, it’s November. Or, as most men will try and convince you, ‘Movember‘. But, either way, that doesn’t change the fact that it’s dark, cold and miserable – three factors that make me want to hug the pillow in the mornings. And I’m not the only one.

Chelsea Apps Factory has developed an app called iCuckoo, which gives people the chance to donate money to one of five charities every time they snooze the alarm.

That’s right. Ranging from 10p to a golden nugget, from now on an extra few minutes in bed could cost you (benefitting charities such as Parkinson’s UK, Prostate Cancer UK and Starlight in the process.) But don’t worry, donations are capped at £30 a month, so if you’re not a morning person you won’t have to remortgage.

I think it’s a really good idea – and it’s already got the PR coverage to prove with the Daily Star, Guardian and Charity Digital News under its belt – but not one that I’ll necessarily adopt.

If you’ve read my previous blogs you’ll get the impression I’m not very forthcoming when it comes to giving, despite working for a charity. That’s not entirely true. I just believe that giving should be a conscious decision – evolving into a long-lasting relationship between an individual and a cause they feel connected with. And, if this practice needs to be ‘masked’ through an everyday activity, is it really a gift?

iCuckoo isn’t the only recent initiative to encourage people to give little, but often, without thinking. Penny for London, whereby commuters can ‘micro donate’ a penny through contactless payment methods when travelling, launched in a bid to support vulnerable young people in the city last week.

I agree that it in our increasingly busy lifestyles, efficient and effective activities that make things easy for us will stand the test of time. In fact, having time to do anything is a luxury these days (so the fact that you’ve read this far means a lot.) But, if a charity’s supporters aren’t engaged then they simply won’t understand it in order to:

1) Make a decision to donate larger sums or more regularly
2) Become brand ambassadors and share their support, either through word of mouth or social media
3) Share ideas to shape its future and make it stronger

I don’t know about you, but I believe all of the these principles are vital in order for organisations to stand out from the crowd.

Overall, it’s great that charities are waking up to new fundraising ideas. But, if they’re looking for a robust long-term strategy they need to sleep on it.

What do you think? Would you sleep in and give more?

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Would you prefer a tattoo of your boss or £25k?

3 Nov

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Crowd-sourcing was coined in 2006 by Wired Magazine. It was used to describe a job, which was usually fulfilled by an employee, that was outsourced to a group of people. Since then it’s been used by brands in a range of weird and wonderful ways. From ‘dead dog‘ jingles to BrewDog’s Twitter beer, it generates ideas and content for businesses – and not many of them are sensible.

Now, premium crisps brand Tyrrells has embraced this fact and, after asking its social media fans for ideas for prizes to bring its promotional packs to life, is running with them. That’s right, Tyrrells is giving consumers the chance to win: a tattoo of your boss, an uncomfortably long handshake or a packet of soil.

Well, blow me down and take me to Waitrose right now because this is the best incentive ever to buy a packet of crisps.

Of course, consumers have an opportunity to trade their prize for £25,000. But I’m looking out for one winner that’ll see the value in winning a pack of lies. After all, it’d make great content for the brand, and the results would be much wider than its own communications channels. You wouldn’t see a feature on a Walkers‘ cash prize winner in The Sun, but with this I can definitely imagine it. It’s PR-journalism gold.

With more than 60,000 consumers already engaging with Tyrrells across Facebook and Twitter, the brand has done a great job of interacting with them. It’s asked them questions and taken their answers seriously, including on the T&Cs, which makes this Field of Dreams marketing promotion a cut-above the rest. What’s more, up to 5 million more fans will have the chance to appreciate the brand’s humour as the competition’s rolled out across the country.

With the crisp market currently worth £927.5m in the UK alone, a well-executed campaign like this can help brands like Tyrrells close down the significant gap that Walkers currently enjoys. And it’s first using social noise to support its attempt.

What would you do? Opt for a sculpture of your Grandma or the money?

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It’s a dogs’ life: Absolute Radio crowd-sources song lyrics

12 Aug

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I love a good crowd-sourcing project but I didn’t expect to read tonight that Absolute Radio listeners were asked to share their dead dog memories to create a new song.

Radio station host Geoff Lloyd launched the ‘Dead Dog Memorial Song‘ after he asked people to share their favourite dog moments – such as eating raw turkey at Christmas and licking ashtrays – as part of a forthcoming feature which’ll form part of his shows.

On paper it’s a top-dog (see what I did there) engaging initiative which has seen people proactively get in touch with Absolute Radio to share their tributes. The good news is the content has been reworked by The Boys Least Likely To, the music team behind iconic adverts including Apple and Coca-Cola.

The bad news is the song’s more annoying jingle than chart single. Judge it for yourself here.

Was I expecting too much? Should I tell the little music mogul aka Simon Cowell on my shoulder to pipe down?

In 24 hours the video has generated over 300 views on YouTube so it’s not viral just yet.

To me, it’s a very random social campaign that cannot really be classified as crowd-sourcing in its own right because that’s what radio stations do every day – engage in conversation with listeners and encourage responses.

It’ll be interesting to see how far Absolute Radio can push this and whether it’ll have longevity, if supported properly by the National Dogs’ Trust – which’ll receive all profits from the song which is available on iTunes.

The campaign would’ve made more sense to me if it was launched alongside an event such as National Dog Day (26 August if you’re interested). And it would’ve had more credibility if the station announced that extra verses would added to the song as the project gathers more tributes. As it stands, the campaign’s already maximised its reach.

But, maybe I just don’t get it because I don’t listen to that station and don’t own a dog. Oops.

What do you think? Is the campaign barking? (That’s the end now, I promise!)

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