Tag Archives: Coca Cola

Burberry’s perfume campaign hits all the right notes

2 Sep

Just weeks after Z-lister Tara Reid launched her Shark scent – inspired by the ‘made for TV’ movie Sharkando 2 – Burberry has put her in her place by releasing My Burberry.

A new fragrance inspired by the fashion brand’s iconic trench coat, the PR project brings together the perfect notes to create a seductive campaign experience – and not just because Cara Delevingne and Kate Moss are involved.

Getting personal
The concept of personalised products isn’t new by any means – Coca-Cola and Cadbury started that game a long time ago – but the approach continues to generate success because we’re suckers for bespoke merchandise. Over the last few years we’ve created a culture whereby we feel a) slightly miffed if our corner shop doesn’t stock our double-barrelled name (please don’t say it’s just me) and b) guilty or awkward for drinking out of ‘someone else’s’ bottle.

But, to make up for its copycat approach, Burberry is offering its customers a touch of class by carving their initials into selected bottles for free. Meaning, within an instant, chief executive and creative officer Christopher Bailey has transformed his product into a ‘must have’ keepsake – just 16 weeks before Christmas.

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Getting social
But, here’s the exciting part. For those who aren’t planning to purchase, Burberry is still giving people a chance to engage with the campaign. It’s encouraging consumers to submit their details via the website, so they can receive information on where in London a video featuring their monogrammed bottle will be shown. Users can also interact with Burberry via Google, 4OD, Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook.

Getting people in store
Burberry is also ensuring everyone who signs up receives directions to their closest Burberry store. So, it’s literally putting its brand on the map.

Essentially – its personal experience, coupled with subtle nudges, will not only help Burberry increase sales but, more importantly, create brand champions. And it’ll work because no two My Burberry experiences will be the same – creating unique content.

With perfumer Francis Kurkdjian already dubbing the perfume as the “…perfect accessory for a Burberry fan”, it’s great to know that the design empire puts as much effort into its campaign as it does for its products.

What do you think? Are personalised products here to stay?

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Secret Cinema drove at 88mph… and stalled

24 Jul

Thousands of angry Back to the Future fans took to social media to express their frustration at the late cancellation of Secret Cinema‘s launch event this evening – and who can blame them?

It’s a serious PR fail which was always going to end badly. Yes, the organisers have said sorry and used social media to disseminate the message to attendees quickly. But, unlike Sainsbury’s, Coca-Cola and Costco (brands which made epic mistakes but used social media to their advantage to make amends), Secret Cinema just let the cat drop out of the bag.

Here’s how:

What’s your problem?
Secret Cinema apologised, but I think it should’ve given a little more information away as to why so many people’s nights were ruined.

*Technical difficulties?
*Health and safety issues?
*Missing DeLorean?

My point is if you’re not transparent about why you’re making these decisions, then people will just start speculating. And that speculation will be plastered across Twitter and Facebook. Oh, and in this case, the national news.

There’s no nice way to say this, but…
Secret Cinema’s news broke on social media and, after just a few moments, went viral. Although, I’m still questioning why 26 people opted to ‘like’ the Facebook post.

What I also don’t understand is why the organisers ran the risk of involving its 201,000 fans in an issue that only affected a small percentage?

Ok, I may be contradicting my point about transparency. But, in the first instance, if it affected me (and they’ve got a week to sort themselves out before I get down there) I would’ve appreciated a personalised e-newsletter or text message breaking the news, rather than running the risk of finding out through my friends.

Ok, if negative press is going to get out, a brand can do little to stop it. But, this could’ve ring-fenced the problem for a short while – if Secret Cinema had the resources to pop down contact details encouraging people to call them with questions (rather than posting on social media.)

Actions speak louder than words
One thing’s for sure, Secret Cinema cannot afford for this problem to continue looming this time tomorrow. With a second round of ticket holders already panicking that they might not even make it to Hill Valley, my recommendation would be for organisers to shift from apologies to olive branches and start making amends sooner rather than later.

I was always expecting big things, but I’m expecting professionalism from Secret Cinema more than ever now.

Watch this space.

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Coca-Cola: Call me anything, just not ‘gay’

29 Jan

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Coca-Cola or Coca-Cock up? It’s hard to tell when this global brand keeps making marketing mistakes.

After asking fans to share a personalised coke, Coca-Cola’s sub brand – Vitamin Water – fell foul of calling one unlucky US customer a ‘retard’. And now, according to BBC Trending, the South African coke microsite has banned people from calling their can of coke ‘Gay’.

‘Computer error’ I hear you ask? Well, technical glitches don’t tend to read:

Oops. Let’s pretend you didn’t just type that. Please try another name.

The brand has since apologised and resolved the issue by clarifying which names can be used on its social media led channel by listing them on the site. But, if Coca-Cola thinks it can move on swiftly it’s highly mistaken.

With the 2014 Winter Games around the corner – featuring Jamaica (probably the most exciting thing about the event) – rightly or wrongly this has definitely become a gay rights issue.

Although the Games wouldn’t happen without its sponsors, it’s down to all marketeers, regardless of what country they’re based in, to communicate with one another to ensure they have an integrated approach. Remember that word? In this industry it doesn’t just look pretty on paper, it means something.

Sure, some might agree that Sochi shouldn’t be punished for South Africa’s mistakes but the truth is a quick phone call could have ensured the brand isn’t tarnished in every time zone. With Russia attracting attention for the wrong reasons since it passed legislation banning propaganda of ‘non traditional sexual relations among minors’, it’s important that businesses know which side of the fence they’re sitting on. Otherwise you’ll have international media, bloggers and entire communities hating on you, including Gay activist John Aravosis.

It’s time for marketeers to take responsibility for their actions because, with this company in particular, ‘sorry’ is wearing thin. If you’re going to put consumers in charge, then you have to be prepared for the consequences.

If in doubt, leave it out! What do you think?

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