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Prime Time is on the move!

2 Dec

We’re in the mood for celebrating! In the past few weeks, we’ve secured new digs, a new job and a new domain.

Hop on over to Prime Time PR (professional, eh?) from now on to stay up-to-date on the latest PR, marketing and digital news and views.

Thank you for making the last two years great. Here’s to the next 2(00)!

We've-moved

Guardians of the Galaxy rewind time by breathing new life into cassettes

26 Oct

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Don’t be fooled. Actors don’t make good movies great. Nor do directors, producers or special effects teams. It’s all in the music. Don’t believe me? This interesting BBC4 documentary series proves it.

And, one film that’s made the most of its soundtrack is this year’s Marvel sensation: Guardians of the Galaxy.

Featuring 10cc’s I’m Not in Love, Blue Swede’s Hooked on a Feeling and Jackson 5’s I Want You Back, these songs enhance viewers’ overall experience just as much as the star-studded cast. So, it’s not surprising that Disney‘s keen to give a nod to the score by releasing it on cassette.

Yes, you heard me. Head into the attic and dust off your Walkman. Dumped yours years ago? (No one would blame you. After all, they’re 37 years old.) Instead you can look one up on eBay from as little as £10.

Disney’s PR and marketing stunt pays homage to the film’s storyline, where lead superhero Peter Quill (aka Star-Lord) enjoys listening to a classic mixtape created by his mother.

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Set to be released next month, this is the mega brand’s first compilation tape since 2003. To create a buzz, Disney’s announced that the cassette will be a limited edition, sold exclusively through independent music retailers and will be sold with a free digital download. So, in my (PRime Time) eyes, it’s done everything right… apart from one thing.

It’s risked compromising its success by waiting until after the mixtape’s vinyl, CD and digital releases. Despite the pre-launch announcement securing write-ups in Shortlist, The Guardian and Billboard, the scope for dominating publicity has been missed.

From planting a giant cassette near an iconic landmark and organising pop-up Walkman audio booths in public areas to trailing competition clues across social media sites to raise awareness and creating an app that gives smartphone and tablet users the look, feel and sound of a cassette, the ideas list is endless. But, I can’t help thinking at that this stage – post soundtrack launch and pre DVD release – it carries the whiff of ‘afterthought’ – a fragrance that no brand wants to smell like.

Anyway that’s just my opinion. What do you think? Do I need to rewind?

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The top five charity hashtag trends you love to hate

8 Oct

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I’m going to let you into a secret. I wasn’t brave enough to take part in #NoMakeUpSelfie, I was nominated for the #IceBucketChallenge twice and I didn’t dunk myself in cold water and although I’ve laughed at CLIC Sargent’s #JokeAppeal campaign, I’ve not donated.

So, there you have it. I’m a bad person.

But, while I’ve not successfully completed the call-to-actions, I do think their social media-driven campaigns are brilliant at raising awareness of very important causes. Transforming the way young people engage with the third sector, these hashtag trends are snowballing and I just can’t keep up.

As a result, I’ve become fed up of my Twitter, Facebook and Instagram timelines constantly getting clogged up with pictures and videos that I feel obliged to like. Because, let’s face it, once you’ve congratulated one person on throwing water on themselves, you really have to do it for everyone. So, people like me, who were once in awe of these great PR and marketing stunts, are now just ‘meh’.

But, if the BBC can be impartial then Prime Time can at least be kind enough to write about them. Which is why, after reading about new ways charities are piggybacking off hashtag explosions, I’m going to rank my top five social media charity phenomenons:

#WakeUpCall

Established by Unicef, in aid of its Syria Emergency Fund, the #WakeUpCall campaign involves celebrities posting photos of themselves… you guessed it… having just woken up.

Kick-started by the charity’s ambassador Jemima Khan, Strictly’s Claudia Winkleman and QI’s Stephen Fry have also got involved to encourage people to open their eyes to the unstable situation in the Middle East affecting young children. And, with more than 3,000 tweets containing the all-important hashtag in the last 12 hours, it’s likely that this initiative will raise a lot of money.

A gallery on the Telegraph online doesn’t hurt either.

Supermodel Naomi Campbell wakes up like this for Unicef#FaceUp

Developed by Plan UK, Face Up is an app that aims to raise awareness of female genital mutilation, sexual violence and child marriage. Once you’ve downloaded the app onto your smart phone you can upload an image which will be imprinted with the words ‘I’m putting girl rights where they can’t be ignored’ and share it in the app’s photo album.

Compared to Unicef’s efforts, this isn’t creating as much of a buzz online yet; tweets are currently in the hundreds – rather than the thousands. But, with PR coverage on The Huffington Post and The Daily Mail online, thanks to support from Game of Thrones stars Natalie Dormer and Lena Headey, it may not be far behind.

Game of Thrones star Natalie Dormer promotes women's rights

#LastSelfie

WWF Denmark and Turkey embraced Snapchat earlier this year and made the most of its self-destruct feature to explain the rate that endangered animals are disappearing.

From tigers and gorillas to pandas and orangutans,  the charity used the hashtag #LastSelfie to encourage people to share the image in order to ‘save’ the species. Persuasive, clever and easy to do, this worked well because the aim was to raise awareness rather than source donations.

Once people had bought into to the severity of the situation, a new call-to-action followed. By focusing on one objective at the time, WWF created an incredibly strong campaign.WWF's #LastSelfie used Snapchat to raise awareness

#FirstWorldProblems

If you’ve never used this hashtag before then I’d love to live your life. #FirstWorldProblems is a generic hashtag used by people when venting online about insignificant annoyances.

For example, I recently almost slipped on a rogue squashed tomato in the supermarket and if I’d known the couscous was down a different aisle I could have avoided the whole hullabaloo.

So, when Water for Life borrowed the phrase – which was used over 106,000 times in the last month alone – and turned it on its head for its emotive campaign, it grabbed people’s attention.

The only issue is that when you Google search the term, the first mention of the charity is on the fourth page and it’s not its official website. This emphasises the importance of ensuring all the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed when linking up your website to generate top SEO rankings.

Water for Life adopted the #FirstWorldProblems hashtag to make a point

#Batkid

I’m a little late to the party on this as it’s a couple of years old now. But, thanks to Miles Scott, a five-year old leukemia survivor, his Make a Wish Foundation dream to become a superhero for a day went viral.

The charity transformed part of San-Fran into Gotham to recreate Batman’s city and kept people up to date via its website and a behind the scenes video ,which was picked up by Twitter users across the world. The hashtags #Batkid and #SFBatkid were used in more than 110 countries reaching 777m people on a cold November day in 2012. Not even I can argue with these figures.

Make a Wish launched #BatKid

Reading through my top five, I can see that there was definitely something special about the slightly older social media stunts employed by charities.

Perhaps I believe they have more charm because I think the brands would’ve shocked themselves at their own success, because they were taking a risk and exploring unknown online territories. Either way, the hashtag trends have exploded so quickly that as long as people get behind them, they’ll continue taking over timelines and securing national headlines for the foreseeable future.

The charities were shocked at their own success, because they were taking a risk and exploring unknown online territories.

Don’t get me wrong, I think social media opens up the floor to make charity PR a level playing field, especially for rarer causes or organisations with tighter budgets. I just don’t believe that if a trend launches in one country for a specific cause, that a different charity across the pond can adopt it as its own. Surely, the cause and challenge should translate wherever it’s used across the world?

Hashtag highjacking, particularly by the big boys, is not big or clever, and it’s certainly a box you don’t want me to open. Utilising the #TubeStrikes is one thing; stealing an entire campaign is another. Know who I’m talking about yet?

What do you think? Did your favourite hashtag trend make the list?

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